Home is Where the Gnome Is – Ensuring the Home and Garden Are Protected

It’s probably fair to say that, for most people at least, home is where the heart is. And it’s through no coincidence that most people’s heart will be exactly where they invest so much of their time, money and energy.

Indeed, a house is a physical embodiment of all the blood, sweat and tears that has gone in to it over the years, and it’s not difficult to understand why people grow so attached to it. And this is also why so many people choose to protect their home against the unexpected, because, after all, ‘you just never know’.

Indeed, little persuasion is needed as to the wisdom of insuring against life’s little mishaps. Those who choose not to have home or contents insurance, risk losing everything they’ve worked for. And as for those who do choose to have home and contents insurance, well, they too still risk losing at least something if they’re not savvy when it comes to their home insurance policies.

It may surprise some to learn that all the contents within their property aren’t automatically covered by their contents insurance policy. Furthermore, it’s probably the most ‘at risk’ area of a property that is most likely to be overlooked. And that place, is in the garden.

Known as ‘contents in the open’, many policies don’t actually cover items outside the four walls of the house, and this is probably the most easily accessible place for any would-be thief. People are spending an increasingly large amount of money on their garden, due in part, perhaps, to the growing popularity of garden-makeover programmes on television. Subsequently, it’s estimated that up to £400million worth of thefts take place in gardens each year, with many people unable to claim against their home or contents insurance.

As with anything, it pays to read the small-print contained within any contents insurance or buildings insurance policy. And when establishing which parts, if any, of the garden are covered, ensure that protection is offered for walls, gates, shrubbery, patios or even the garden gnome. Furthermore, it’s worth ensuring that all the potential scenarios that are covered within the confines of the house, such as fire, water and even accidental damage, are also covered in the garden area. After all, if it can happen inside the house, it can happen outside the house too.

Most people are well aware of the latent hazards that exist in any functional house, which is why it makes so much sense to insure against those potential pitfalls. This wisdom should extend beyond the four walls too, but many people simply aren’t aware that their garden might not be covered by standard policies. So, check the small print and take action now. Because you never know what tomorrow may bring.

Safeguard Your Home and Garden For Health and Safety

Birds are awesome! I love birds! But they can also make quite a mess of your property if they are not controlled. So whether it’s a pigeons, sparrows, seagulls, starlings, crows or geese, pests can cause all sorts of problems. Pest can severely damage wood homes, siding and shingles, and can damage your lawn. They can eat the fruit and vegetables you plant and their droppings can carry disease such as West Nile Virus, Avian Flu, and Histoplasmosis. They usually mate for life, live in communal flocks that travel together, and inclined to search for locations where sufficient food and shelter can be found. With the spring nesting and garden planting season already in progress – you might want to get started now on protecting your property and plants from pest problems. The longer pests dwell in an area, the harder it is to get them to move on. So it is vital to tackle a pest problem as soon as one is spotted.

The Bird Repeller helps to protect objects from being landed on by them. Birds and Pigeons on a balcony or patio area are a very common problem. These areas provide shelter, and prime nesting locations. Audible Bird repellent can help with this problem; they cover wide areas, and require no maintenance. Window sills provide a perch, and often shelter. Making the sill un-usable for pigeons is a good way to stop a pigeon from choosing your window. Some bird control devices make it difficult for pests to land. Products such as the Bird Spikes or Bird Gel work well in this situation. Usually people are troubled with the noise and mess birds create while in a tree. If they are not nesting you could try the ultrasonic bird repeller this emits killer and suffering calls, when birds hear these calls their natural instinct is to escape the area. With the ultrasonic bird repeller you can keep the bird away from your house and garden without harming them. An eave is the perfect home for a bird. The best way to keep smaller birds out of an eave is to block them out with bird netting. The bird netting acts as a physical barrier. The Solar Powered Bird Repeller is a visual bird repeller that will stop birds being a nuisance around things such as signs, streetlights, roofs and walls.. If woodpeckers have chosen your home to peck at, there are a few successful items you can use. Bird scare products work well with a woodpecker problem. Some bird repeller has sparkling foil eyes to scare away birds by day and glow-in-the-dark backsides to keep them away at night.

You should also know that USA Bird Control, Inc. sets the standard for modern bird control, their products are humane and easy to install, and they require no maintenance. If pest birds have been returning to your home and garden for many years or the problem you face is especially severe, you will probably want to use a combination of their excellent bird control products to solve it and keep the pest birds away. They offer a full line of easy to use birds control products that can remedy virtually any pest bird problem, and the products are designed for home use!

Mass Plants For Better Homes and Gardens

For a coffee table or for a narrow shelf, choose a small gem that asks and deserves to be looked at closely. Just as an attractive ashtray or a colorful pillow can be a tasteful, decorative accent, so can small plants. They can pick up room colors, provide interesting contrast of form, and add attention-getting detail. But just as it would be wrong to expect a small accessory to carry a big decorative role in the home, so it would be a mistake to hope for big impact from a single small plant.

But a grouping of plants, many small, or one or two big plants, can carry important roles in a decorating scheme. The mass effect of a handsome grouping of plants has universal appeal. Any one plant in the group may be beautiful in its own right, though possible to overlook if alone. But put several plants together in the right setting and you can’t possibly ignore their presence.

Of course, there’s more than one way to group plants. A well-chosen pair is often just what you need to give a room that special touch. An assortment of many flowering varieties gives the same pleasure as looking into a florist’s shop window. An all-foliage cluster, such as the one on the opposite page, is equally appealing.

Ideally, the area that you select for a dramatic display of plants should receive a good amount of natural light. If the day light’s inadequate, however, give preference to the setting that you have chosen and then consider what steps can be taken to reinforce natural light with artificial light. You can do this with ceiling spots, recessed light fixtures, or fluorescent tube lighting.

It is also feasible, if your plant group is not too large, to install it on a mobile cart, taking it by day to a window location, then returning it after sundown to the room placement that you prefer.

Since plants grown indoors vary considerably in amounts of light required to promote good growth, you’ll be wise to choose for a dramatic grouping – varieties that have similar light needs. If the available natural light is low, choose plants from the group that can easily tolerate low light. If, on the other hand, your best location offers medium to strong light, select all of your plants for that kind of light.

To help you select from the right group, turn to the section entitled ‘A Portfolio’ of Recommended House Plants/ in which plants are grouped according to the kind of light they need.

Another important resource is your florist or greenhouse man.Besides supplying you with facts concerning light needs,he can give you a great deal of added information on plant cultural requirements (soil, water,humidity, etc.). From years of experience in the field, he will know which plants are cinch-to-grow types, and which are not.

After checking on compatibility of cultural needs, you’ll want to seek contrasts of color,texture, and form within your group. Some of the greens vary from the palest chartreuse to almost black tones. Some plants have shiny foliage; others have a furry or velvety finish. There are also plants with big, pointed shaped leaves as well as rounded and pierced ones to choose from.

Get variety in size, too. Combine some tall and some short plants. Place taller ones toward the back; the shorter ones, forward. For a start, consider these combinations: a pot or two of small yellow chrysanthemums made to look still more flowery when backed by a good-sized dieffenbachia; or delicate ferns that take on the appearance of green lace if backed by the solid foliage of big-leaved philodendrons or rubber plants.